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Tech Tip: Stingray software and system-level SNMP data

by crispin on ‎02-22-2013 06:57 AM (878 Views)

Stingray Virtual Appliances automatically export lots of standard information about the running system, such as traffic through the network cards, memory usage and CPU usage.  This information is obtained from the operating system-level SNMP service.

A standard Stingray software installation contains an SNMP agent that provides a wealth of data about the performance and activity of the Stingray software.  With a little bit of configuration, you can integrate the Stingray SNMP agent with your local OS agent to give a single point for both OS and Stingray SNMP data.

Step 1: Verify that the Stingray SNMP agent is running on the public SNMP port (161):


# snmpget -v1 -c public localhost SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.7146.1.2.1.1.0


SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.7146.1.2.1.1.0 = STRING: "9.1"





SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.7146.1.2.1.1.0 is the SNMP OID corresponding to the version if the running Stingray software.  You can use the 'friendly names' if you follow these instructions: Installing the Stingray SNMP MIBs:


# snmpget -v1 -c public localhost ZXTM-MIB::version.0


ZXTM-MIB::version.0 = STRING: "9.1"





Step 2: Reconfigure the Stingray SNMP agent to run on an internal port

Go to the Stingray Admin Server and reconfigure the SNMP settings as follows:

SettingValue
snmp!enabledYes
snmp!bindip127.0.0.1
snmp!allowlocalhost
snmp!port1161
snmp!communityprivate

Step 3: Install Net-SNMP and configure it to proxy to the Stingray SNMP agent

Install Net-SNMP on the host server (often named 'snmpd' by package managers such as apt). Either edit the Net-SNMP configuration file (often /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf) or create a new /etc/snmp/snmpd.local.conf; add the following to the end:



# Proxy Stingray oids to the Stingray server


proxy -v 1 -c private localhost:1161 .1.3.6.1.4.1.7146





4. Restart the snmp server.

You should now be able to see both system and Stingray oids through the SNMP server running on the standard port (161). If you can only see a limited subset of the system OIDS (and none of the Stingray ones) ensure that the access control in the snmpd.conf file is not too restrictive.