SAN Health Utility

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Contributor
Posts: 69
Registered: ‎09-16-2003

Zoning issues ?

Hi,

Regular Contributor
Posts: 178
Registered: ‎08-08-2003

Re: Zoning issues ?

Good question. What is a Hanging Alias?

Contributor
Posts: 69
Registered: ‎09-16-2003

Re: Zoning issues ?

Here is attached the Excel file I have received, so you can see the "hanging" in the zoning.I've looked at FAQ, and also Fabric OS procedure guide and Fabric OS reference guide, ans also Zoning guide, but I haven't found anything about hanging in the zoning.

Contributor
Posts: 69
Registered: ‎09-16-2003

Re: Zoning issues ?

I have found what are these hanging alias <!graemlin:Smiley Very Happy> These are ports where there is nothing connected to. <!graemlin:Smiley Wink>

N/A
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎09-21-2003

Re: Zoning issues ?

In my case, the "hanging alias" was a system that had zones and aliases defined but was offline (as in powered off).

N/A
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎12-02-2003

Re: Zoning issues ?

I had the same problem, when the servers were powered on and the tool was re-run, the hanging aliases were gone.. Thanks!

Moderator
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎02-23-2004

Re: Zoning issues ?

"the hanging aliases were gone"<!graemlin:Smiley Happy>What you noticed on the hanging aliases should have only occurred in the first week after we added this functionality to the reports. On some FOS versions SAN Health could mistakenly report some extra hanging zones - mostly for zones that used the Fabric Assist method for defining an initiator - the curly brackets were not decoded correctly Single HBA zoning most closely recreates the original SCSI bus. Each zone created has only one HBA (initiator) in the zone, with each target device then added to the zone. Typically, you should create a zone for the HBA and then add disk storage ports. If the HBA accesses tape devices, you should create a second zone for the HBA and associated tape devices. In the case of clustered systems, it might be appropriate to include an HBA from each of the cluster members in the zone. This technique is equivalent to having a shared SCSI bus between cluster members, and presumes that the clustering software provides a way to manage access to the shared devices. In a large fabric, this requires the creation of possibly hundreds of zones. However, each zone would contain only a few members. As a result, zone changes would affect the smallest possible number of devices, minimizing the impact of an incorrect zone change. Because of these advantages, the single HBA zoning strategy is considered a Brocade best practice.

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