SAN Health Utility

Using SAN Health - Setting up an automated monthly/weekly/daily audit

by Moderator ‎05-24-2012 01:09 PM - edited ‎03-20-2014 04:04 PM (3,601 Views)

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4.0
 

 

These upper instructions are for SAN Health 4.0 and later.  For instructions creating an automated task to run the older verison of SAN Health (3.2) please see below.

 

SAN Health 4.0

Creating a new SAN Health automated task in newer versions of Windows (including Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 and later):

 

Create an audit SET file in SAN Health and run it at least once to ensure that all values have been entered correctly and that it functions correctly.

Open Task Scheduler

Select Action > Create Task

On General Tab, enter the following:

                Name of task

                Optional Description

                "Run only when user is logged on" should be checked if desired

                -or-

                "Run whether user is logged on or not" should be checked if desired

                Other options can be left as default

On the Triggers Tab, enter the following:

                Select New...

                Begin the task on a schedule

                Select the frequency including start date

On the Actions Tab select New...

                Action should be set as "Start a program"

 

                In the Settings box, under Program/script, add "C:\Program Files\Brocade\SAN Health\SANHealth.exe" (with the quotation marks) or browse to its location and select it

 

                In the Add arguments box put the entire path of the .SET file with or quotation marks around it, followed by /autostart without quotes

 

Test the Task by setting it for 5 minutes in the future and seeing if it launches correctly.  (Windows will often not launch a task that is set in 3 or less minutes in the future.)

 

In order to have the audit file automatically uploaded at the end of the task, the .SET file needs to have one of the options filled out in SAN Health under Options > Audit Data File Upload.  This will need to be done before the Windows Task is run.

 

 

 

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Instructions below are for the older version of SAN Health, 3.2.

 

SAN Health 3.2

Creating a new SAN Health automated task in newer versions of Windows (including Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 and later):

 
Create an audit SET file in SAN Health and run it at least once to ensure that all values have been entered correctly and that it functions correctly.

Open Task Scheduler

Select Action > Create Task

On General Tab, enter the following:

                Name of task

                Optional Description

                "Run only when user is logged on" should be selected

                Leave all other options as default

On the Triggers Tab, enter the following:

                Select New...

                Begin the task on a schedule

                Select the frequency including start date

On the Actions Tab select New...

                Action should be set as "Start a program"

                In the Settings box, under Program/script, add "C:\Program Files\Brocade\SAN Health\SANHealth.exe" (with the quotation marks) or browse to its location and select it

                In the Add arguments box put the entire path of the .SET file (quotation marks not needed)

Test the Task by setting it for 5 minutes in the future and seeing if it launches correctly.  (Windows will often not launch a task that is set in 3 or less minutes in the future.)

 

In order to have the audit file automatically uploaded at the end of the task, the .SET file needs to have one of the options filled out in SAN Health under Options > Audit Data File Upload.  This will need to be done before the Windows Task is run.

 

 

Creating a new SAN Health automated task in older versions of Windows (including Windows XP, Windows Server 2003 and earlier):

Create an audit SET file and run it at least once to ensure that all values have been entered correctly and that it functions correctly.

From Control Panel, Scheduled Tasks select "Add Scheduled Tasks."

As a target, select the SAN Health application. With the default installation path, this would be "C:\Program Files\Brocade\SAN Health\SANHealth.exe".

To the command line that is executed, add the full path and name of the audit SET file.

Example: "C:\Program Files\Brocade\SAN Health\SANHealth.exe" "C:\Captures\FabricB.SET"

Select the time and date that you wish to run the Audit and the Windows account that the program will run under.

 

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It is important to note that SAN Health runs in the foreground and not as a background process. This was done on purpose so that users can monitor and or stop any switch session at any point in time.

As SAN Health always runs in the foreground, it must execute in a logged on users workspace. The scheduled execution of SAN Health will fail if the workstation running it is not logged on at the time.

It is recommended to right-click on your newly created task and select RUN, to immediately run the audit and confirm that the scheduled task executed as expected.

If SAN Health does not open and start the audit then there is a problem with the setup of the scheduled task. If the Windows process list displays that SANHealth.exe is running, however SAN Health is not visible on the screen, then it is most likely that the scheduled task does not have the correct user account or password settings.

If a scheduled task completes correctly SAN Health will automatically close and save a log of the operation alongside the newly created Brocade SAN Health (BSH) file. If an error occurs during execution of SAN Health, the program is left open and stopped at the occurrence of the error. A log file is not saved at this point; if you wish to keep a record of the failure you should save the activity log before exiting SAN Health.

 

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Using the automatic upload option may be useful when executing scheduled SAN Health audits.  Please see SAN Health Tabs and Options for auto upload options.

 

 
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