Federal Insights

Anthony Robbins

The Future is Now for Federal IT Transformation

by Anthony Robbins on ‎08-11-2014 01:41 PM (1,958 Views)

No longer are we at the end of an IT lifecycle – we’re at the beginning of a new one

 

In this day and age, we expect our financial transactions, social networks, cars and even our televisions to operate at lightning fast speeds, enable unlimited connectivity and deliver services at the push of a button.  We should expect and receive the same from the services our federal government provides.  From interactions with civilian agencies for major life events to enjoying the freedoms made possible by the critical defense functions carried out by our military, citizens should be able to rely on government to provide seamless functionality and ease of use. All of these elements are enabled and supported by a modernized network.

 

The current government network is approaching the end of its lifecycle, with legacy infrastructure no longer able to support the need for increased IT capacity and bandwidth. The private sector has already been leveraging innovative technologies such as SDN and NFV, demonstrating their potential to simplify network management and accommodate the explosion of apps and devices.  

As government CIOs look for better ways to invest their shrinking budgets, it’s important to look at network modernization as a building block for delivering a new lifecycle of solutions, services, applications, and capabilities.

 

This year’s Federal Forum on August 13 at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C., brings together the government and industry technology community to meet, and discuss some of the most innovative and transformative projects that have delivered significant gains.

 

Co-hosted by Brocade and MeriTalk, the Federal Forum features leading government experts and industry executives who will share lessons learned, discuss modernization priorities and apply their insights to improve the way technology solves big-picture problems. The only way for government to reclaim its trusted status as a leading innovator of services and solutions that improve people’s lives is by no longer expecting more out of existing, aging networks and recognizing that an investment in the new network is paramount to mission success. 

 

The new network isn’t the network of the future – it’s the network of today.  It’s here now, and we’re ready to put it to action.  Are you?

 

Be part of the change engine and attend the Federal Forum: 

Register today at www.federalforum2014.com